Sat July 17th – PAF Shab-e She’r Featuring Zara Houshmand and Extended Open Mic!

ZaraSaturday, July 17, 2010  4 – 6 pm

Bowery Poetry Club / 308 Bowery / NYC 10012 / Subway to 2nd Avenue F train

This special edition of our Persian poetry series will feature Zara Houshmand, an Iranian-American writer who lives in Austin, Texas. Her work includes poetry, theatre, virtual reality translation, and editing the “Mind & Life” dialogues between the Dalai Lama and scientists. Her poetry has been published in online and print literary journals. Her most recent book is A Mirror Garden (A. A. Knopf, 2007), a memoir co-authored with Monir Farmanfarmaian.

This event will also feature an extended open mic portion.  We are opening the stage to any and all readers, artists, musicians who would like to read or perform their own work or recite works by other poets.  A special appearance by PAF Founder, Mona Kayhan, will be among the readers!  Works can be in Persian or English, bearing some connection to Iran or Iranian/Persian culture.  Sign up to read at the event or early sign-up by email poetry@persianartsfestival.org.

Persian Arts Festival (PAF) revived Shab-e She’r, A Night of (Persian) Poetry, at the Bowery Poetry Club (BPC) but with a modern spin.  Our program expands what tends to be a very classical Persian tradition to feature modern works of literature, ranging from fictional novels to memoirs. PAF and BPC continue to host readings of well-established and emerging authors who are of Persian descent or specialize in Persian literature. Readers have included Nahid Rachlin, Manijeh Nasrabadi and Joe Martin to name a few.

June 16th, PAF presents: Shab-e She’r feat. Firoozeh Kashani-Sabet

Martyrdom StreetJune 16, 2010 6pm-7:30pm
PAF presents: Shab-e She’r feat. Firoozeh Kashani-Sabet!

Bowery Poetry Club / 308 Bowery / NYC 10012 / Subway to 2nd Avenue F train

Our June 16th Shab-e She’r series will feature Firoozeh Kashani-Sabet! Professor Kashani-Sabet teaches Middle Eastern history and directs the Middle East Center at the University of Pennsylvania. She received her B.A. with distinction from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill as a Morehead Scholar and completed her M.A., M.Phil., and Ph.D. in history at Yale University.  This event will celebrate the recent publication of her first novel, Martyrdom Street, published by Syracuse University Press. She has started a second novel and hopes to complete a series of children’s books in the future.

Her book, Frontier Fictions: Shaping the Iranian Nation, 1804-1946 (Princeton University Press, 1999) looks at the significance of land and border disputes in Iranian nationalism, with attention to Iran’s shared boundaries with the Ottoman Empire (and later Iraq and Turkey), Russia, Afghanistan and the Gulf states. Frontier Fictions is currently being translated into Persian by Kitabsara Press, Iran.

Professor Kashani-Sabet has also finished a book entitled, Conceiving Citizens: Women, Sexuality, and Religion in Modern Iran (forthcoming, Oxford University Press, 2010). She is also completing a book on America’s historical relationship with Iran and the Islamic world entitled, The Making of the ‘Great Satan’: A History of US – Iranian Relations (under contract with Princeton University Press). In addition to pursuing her academic work, Professor Kashani-Sabet spends time writing fiction.

An open mic will follow the reading, inviting everyone to read either his or her own poetry or works by other poets, in Persian or English, bearing some connection to Iran or Iranian/Persian culture. To sign up to read, please email poetry@persianartsfestival.org.

This event will be streamed LIVE at http://www.bowerypoetry.com!

Persian Arts Festival (PAF) revived Shab-e She’r, A Night of (Persian) Poetry, at the Bowery Poetry Club (BPC) but with a modern spin. Our program expands what tends to be a very classical Persian tradition to feature modern works of literature, ranging from fictional novels to memoirs. PAF and BPC continue to host readings of well-established and emerging authors who are of Persian descent or specialize in Persian literature. Readers have included Nahid Rachlin, Manijeh Nasrabadi and Joe Martin to name a few.

An invitation to participate in “The American in Paris is an Iranian in New York”, by Amir Parsa

amirparsa

“An invitation to TAKE PART in Amir Parsa’s unfolding Kanto I.2, ‘The American in Paris is an Iranian in New York’ on amirparsa.net.

You can contribute to this scriptage and cumulation starting now and on June 12 from 9 to 3 east. with live exchanges while Amir and friends meander though Paris streets with stops at specific sites, reading and writing multiple parallel narratives.

HERE’S HOW:
a/help begin, write and end parallel fragments of kantô I.2;
b/comment or critique;
c/interpret;
d/chronicle;
e/whatever else you fancy, and/or
f/any possible hybrids (that should cover everything!) to get a new type of text.

For more info, go to amirparsa.net and ‘The American in Paris is an Iranian in New York’.”

Hermaphrodite, A Performance Art Piece by Désirée Navab and Chervine Dalaeli

hermaphroditeposterCollaboration of Aphrodite Désirée Navab and Chervine Dalaeli
Saturday, June 12th, 7-9 pm
ZORASPACE 315 4th Avenue b/w 3rd & 2nd St in Park Slope, Brooklyn

In this collaboration, Aphrodite Désirée Navab and Chervine Dalaeli, artists who are from Iran and based in NYC, explore the gender stereotypes and pressures of Iranian patriarchal culture. Chervine photographs Aphrodite as she transforms herself into a Hermaphrodite, wearing a traditional shalwar chemise, mustache and turban and follows her as she interacts with the public for several weeks. For the event at Zoraspace, Hermaphrodite will perform the exclusively male Persian ritualized exercise tradition called Zurkhaneh, “house of strength”.

Hermaphrodite 2010 critiques gender expectations at the same time that it is a metaphor for the condition of exile, neither here nor there, but both, neither Iranian nor American, but both. To be ‘unhomed’, as cultural studies theorist Homi Bhabha puts it, does not mean that Hermaphrodite is ‘homeless’. Nor does it mean that s/he can be accommodated easily. By occupying two places at once, Hermaphrodite is a hybrid who becomes difficult to place. It is within this ‘third space’ of working, contesting and reconstructing that hermaphrodite creates an opening for other positions to emerge. Hermaphrodite’s performances and the resulting photographs and videos from these interventions allow for a space of ‘unhomeliness’–a space of trans-national and cross-cultural initiations.

March 2011 is PAFs 5th Annual Festival — POSTER CONTEST in the works!

PAF turns 5 years old in 2011!!!

Our 5th Annual festival will be March 2011, final date TBD.
We’ve decided to run a poster contest, the winning poster will be our official poster / image.  Submission details coming.

In the meantime…we’d be interested to hear some possible theme ideas.
Send them to us via Facebook or email at contest@persianartsfestival.org

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